If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right. Switch to Accessible Site
Reisterstown
review us
follow us
like us
mobile menu
Tuesday, 18 June 2024 00:00

Diagnosing an Achilles tendon injury, such as a tear or rupture, involves several precise steps to ensure accurate identification and treatment. First, a podiatrist will discuss your symptoms, focusing on any sharp pain in the ankle or back of the leg, difficulty walking, or an audible snap at the time of injury. A thorough physical examination follows, often starting with the Thompson test, where the podiatrist will squeeze your calf muscle while you lie face down. A lack of foot movement suggests a tear. Plantar flexion tests assess your ability to flex the foot and stand on your toes. Visible signs, like a soft spot or bruising near the tendon, also may indicate damage to the Achilles tendon. Weight-bearing tests evaluate your capacity to stand on the injured foot and detect limping. For a more detailed view, imaging tests such as ultrasound or MRI may be performed. An ultrasound provides 2D images to pinpoint partial tears, while an MRI offers 3D images, which are particularly useful for identifying complete ruptures where tendon ends are detached. If you suspect an Achilles tendon injury, it's suggested that you make an immediate appointment with a podiatrist for a diagnosis and treatment. 

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Mark Spier of Maryland. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia and Reisterstown, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries
Tuesday, 11 June 2024 00:00

Diabetic wound care is a critical aspect of managing diabetes-related complications, particularly concerning foot health. Diabetes can affect wound healing due to vascular and neuropathic issues that result from high blood sugar levels. Reduced circulation and oxygenation in tissues, coupled with neuropathy-induced numbness, make foot wounds more susceptible to infections. Individuals experiencing poor wound healing due to diabetes-related nerve and blood vessel damage may encounter additional complications, including heart disease, kidney disease, and eye problems. Additionally, if an untreated wound becomes infected, the infection may extend locally to affect muscle and bone, a condition known as osteomyelitis. Untreated infections also can progress to gangrene, a significant cause of amputations in individuals with diabetes. In severe cases, uncontrolled infections can lead to sepsis, wherein the infection spreads into the bloodstream, posing a life-threatening situation. A podiatrist is trained to manage diabetic wounds in the feet. If you are living with diabetes or have concerns about wound care, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for a full exam and treatment options.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia and Reisterstown, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 04 June 2024 00:00

Heart failure presents a complex web of symptoms, one of the most visible being swollen feet. This swelling, known as edema, stems from the heart's inability to effectively circulate blood throughout the body. As the heart weakens, blood flow slows, causing fluid to accumulate in the lower extremities due to gravity's pull. This edema is not just uncomfortable, it serves as a crucial indicator of worsening heart failure. Recognizing this connection is vital for timely intervention and management. Here, the role of a podiatrist, a specialized foot care professional, becomes paramount. Podiatrists can assess the severity of swelling, provide guidance on managing edema, and offer treatments to alleviate discomfort. They work in tandem with cardiologists and other healthcare providers to address the broader implications of swollen feet in heart patients. If you have swollen feet, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist who can provide you with a diagnosis and treatment options. 

Swollen feet can be a sign of an underlying condition. If you have any concerns, contact Dr. Mark Spier of Maryland. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Swollen feet are a common ailment among pregnant women and people who stand or sit for extended periods. Aging may increase the possibility of swollen feet and patients who are obese often notice when their feet are swelling too. There may be medical reasons why swollen feet occur:

  • Phlebitis - A condition that causes the veins to become inflamed and can also cause leg pain.
  • Liver disease - This may lead to low blood levels of albumin which is a protein. This can cause fluid in the blood to pass into the tissues and several areas of the body can become swollen.
  • Heart failure - When the heart doesn’t pump properly the blood that is normally pumped back to the heart can pool in the veins of the legs causing swollen feet.
  • Kidney disease - One of the main functions of the kidneys is releasing excess fluid in the body. This type of condition can make it difficult for the kidneys to function properly, and as a result the feet may become swollen.
  • Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT)- This is a serious condition where blood clots form in the veins of the legs. They can block the return of blood from the legs to the heart which may cause the feet to swell. It is important to be treated by a podiatrist if this condition is present.

Swollen feet can also be caused by bone and tendon conditions, including fractures, arthritis, and tendinitis. Additionally, there may be skin and toenail conditions and an infection may cause the feet to swell. Patients who take medicine to treat high blood pressure may be prone to getting swollen feet. 

Many patients elevate their feet to help relieve the swelling and this is generally a temporary remedy. When a podiatrist is consulted the reason behind the swelling can be uncovered and subsequently treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia and Reisterstown, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.


 

Read more about Swelling of the Feet
Friday, 31 May 2024 00:00

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Connect with us

Dr. Mark E. Spier featured articles