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Reisterstown

September 2021

Tuesday, 28 September 2021 00:00

Top 5 Causes of Swollen Feet 

There are many possible causes of swollen feet—ranging from mild, temporary conditions to severe medical emergencies. Here is a run-down of the top 5: 1) Trauma. After an injury, the body’s inflammatory response floods the injured area with white blood cells, antibodies, proteins, and other fluids, causing swelling and inflammation. 2) Diseases. Diseases of the heart, kidney, liver, and lymphatic system can compromise the body’s ability to pump or regulate the blood, and expel wastes, causing a build-up of fluid in various parts of the body—including the feet and legs. 3) Venous Insufficiency. Swelling in the feet and legs may occur when the venous valves—which return blood back to the heart—are damaged and dysfunctional. 4) Pregnancy. Hormonal surges and a growing uterus pressurize veins and increase water and sodium—leading to edema (swelling) in the feet, hands, and legs. 5) Inactivity. Sitting or standing still for prolonged periods of time can cause fluid to temporarily accumulate in the tissues of the feet and ankles. If your feet or ankles become swollen or painful, schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia and Reisterstown, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 21 September 2021 00:00

Should I See a Doctor for My Heel Pain?

Heel pain is one of the most common conditions podiatrists help treat, and it can have a variety of causes. Common causes of heel pain include plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, bursitis, a ruptured Achilles tendon, or a heel fracture. There are a few key signs that your heel pain may be serious and needs to be checked by a podiatrist. If the pain continually worsens, stops you from doing daily activities, has not improved after a couple of weeks, or causes a tingling sensation in the heel, there may be a more serious issue at play that should be checked by a podiatrist. If the pain is severe, hinders your ability to walk, or was accompanied by a popping sensation at the time of injury, these may be signs of an even more serious injury that should be treated immediately.  

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Dr. Mark Spier of Maryland. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Columbia and Reisterstown, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

Six Ways to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are wounds that occur on the feet of diabetic patients. These wounds may heal poorly, slowly, and have an increased risk of becoming infected. Because of this, prompt and proper wound care is necessary. Your podiatrist may treat your DFU by keeping pressure off of the wound using casts, boots, specialty shoes, or off-loading devices. The wound may also need to be debrided, which involves removing dead or damaged tissue and any foreign objects from the wound. You will then need to keep the foot clean and dry and moisturize the area with a prescribed cream to promote healing. Your doctor might also suggest ways to improve your circulation or prescribe additional therapies to encourage the wound to heal. For more information about caring for DFUs, please consult with a podiatrist. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia and Reisterstown, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Friday, 10 September 2021 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Tuesday, 07 September 2021 00:00

Fracture of the Pinky Toe

The pinky toe is the smallest toe on the foot, and it is located on the outside of the foot.  It can easily be involved in an injury and be painful to deal with when broken.  A broken pinky toe will often appear to be bruised, and can turn red and purple. Some patients experience swelling, as well as misalignment of the affected toe. An effective diagnosis may involve undergoing an X-ray, which can help to determine what type of fracture it is. A hairline fracture can be treated by resting the affected foot, and relief may be found when an elastic bandage is worn. Patients who are over sixty-five may be prone to enduring a dislocated toe, meaning separation of the bones in the toe. If you feel you may have broken your toe, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can help you with correct treatment options.

Broken toes may cause a lot of pain and should be treated as soon as possible. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Mark Spier from Maryland. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is a Broken Toe?

A broken toe occurs when one or more of the toe bones of the foot are broken after an injury. Injuries such as stubbing your toe or dropping a heavy object on it may cause a toe fracture.

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Swelling
  • Pain (with/without wearing shoes)
  • Stiffness
  • Nail Injury

Although the injured toe should be monitored daily, it is especially important to have a podiatrist look at your toe if you have severe symptoms. Some of these symptoms include worsening or new pain that is not relieved with medication, sores, redness, or open wounds near the toe.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Columbia and Reisterstown, MD . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
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